Help Refugees

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It has never been easier for you to donate to Choose Love / Help Refugees – you can now do so via text.

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UK

You can donate any amount you like via text, all you need to do is:

 

Text CHOOSELOVE 3 to 70450 to donate £3

 

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Don’t forget to add your Gift Aid information, using the link sent in the “Thank you” text.

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There is no need to include the donation amount, as you will be asked about this in the follow-up message. Simply fill in the form using the link you are sent.

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We would not be able to do our work without your support and kindness. Please click through on these links if you would like to find out more about our work or make a donation. Thank you!

 

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Brexit & LGBTQ+ Rights: The Threat to Transgender Asylum Seekers

In light of the 50th anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall riots, it is important to celebrate how far society has come in its advocacy and implementation of LGBTQI+ rights. In the UK alone, from the Gender Recognition Act 2004 to the Equality Act 2010, the 21st century has seen a vast increase in legislation passed specifically to protect the rights of LGBTQI+ people. Whilst this demonstrates clear progression, we simply cannot become complacent.

In the turbulent political climate we currently face in the UK, the nation’s divide on Brexit has led to increased anticipation regarding the future of employment, business, trade and immigration. Often overlooked amidst the chaos is the imminent threat and ongoing uncertainty to be faced by the LGBTQI+ community and the knock-on effect this may have on transgender individuals seeking refuge in the UK.

EU Legislation

As it currently stands, Britain is protected by the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights which asserts under Article 21 that discrimination based on any ground, including sexual orientation and gender identity, is prohibited. Harrowingly, this charter is set to be discarded upon Britain’s departure from the EU and will see specifically transgender individuals left without express legal protection. In a time whereby hostility towards transgender individuals is rife and extremely topical, what does the future hold for transgender asylum seekers in the UK?

Rising Threats

In a recent report by ILGA (International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association) analysing 49 countries within Europe, clear regression in policies on equality and sexual discrimination was recorded for the first time in a decade. With a spike in hate crime towards LGBTQI+ individuals documented by Stonewall in a 2017 report and the stigmatisation of gender identity in the media in recent months, transgender individuals are becoming exposed to a gruelling rise in abuse.

An investigation by the University of Bristol asserts that EU law is ‘the justification for including transgender identities within our current equality framework’ and thus alludes to the potential erasure of non-discrimination rights for trans individuals upon the UK’s departure from the EU.

When combined with the fact that post-Brexit immigration policy is proposed to subject migrants to further scrutiny, this disregard of non-discrimination rights for trans individuals beckons the question: will the Home Office prioritise the safety of a transgender individual fleeing persecution in their home country when Britain fails to ensure the protection of its own transgender citizens?

In 2017, a British transgender woman was granted residency in New Zealand on humanitarian grounds after suffering years of transphobic abuse whilst living in the UK. Since settling in New Zealand in 2009, she has lived with reduced anxiety and depression due to experiencing no further abuse since her move. Incidents as tragic as this could rocket when there is no longer any legal obligation to be non-discriminatory towards trans individuals.

As a result, rather than the UK securing its status as a place of refuge for transgender asylum seekers, in a cruel twist of irony it may see itself become an environment from which transgender citizens will want to flee.

Applying for Asylum

Observing the UK’s current approach to transgender asylum seekers leaves little room for speculation on the damning reality to come. In recent times, cases of distressing and invasive screening during the UK asylum process for LGBTQI+ individuals have surfaced. Under current asylum law, individuals can apply for refugee status in the UK if able to prove that they fear persecution in their home country due to factors such as race, religion, gender identity or sexual orientation.

The requirement to prove such fear of persecution is where one issue within the asylum process lies and has been grossly exploited. The onus is on the applicant to establish the likelihood of their home country inflicting serious harm based on gender identity or sexual orientation. The applicant must also provide evidential proof of their sexual orientation and/or gender identity – an aspect which often leaves the individual in a catch-22 scenario if they have been forced to suppress their true identity in their country of origin.

Discriminatory Detention

Despite the fact that applicants are not required to have been publicly open with their sexuality/gender identity to be granted asylum, the difficulty lies in convincing the Home Office of their legitimacy. This has devastatingly led to LGBTQI+ individuals having their privacy infringed upon in an attempt to prove they are sincere.

In a 2016 report by UKLGIG titled ‘No Safe Refuge’, LGBTQI+ applicants for asylum who were held in detention centres across the UK were interviewed and revealed the extensive abuse and discrimination endured. Many detainees told of how the interviewing officers asked intrusive questions ‘targeted to gain explicit content’ despite this having been ‘strongly discouraged’ by the Home Office in 2015. In one troubling case, a Nigerian gay rights activist who was accused of ‘faking’ her sexuality to gain asylum in the UK resorted to sending the judge an intimate video in a desperate attempt to prove her sexual orientation.

That LGBTQI+ individuals seeking asylum are so often detained and obstructed from gaining refugee status due to a lack of evidence is the epitome of injustice with transgender individuals often hit the hardest by this requirement. Finding themselves unable to express their gender due to fear of targeting by fellow detainees yet pressed by interviewing officers for not ‘looking’ transgender, many transgender asylum seekers are left feeling trapped and helpless.

Post-Brexit Policy

Once leaving the EU, it ought to be a priority that any remnant of the inhumane hostile environment policy is eradicated. In a stark attempt to decrease immigration numbers, the policy was introduced by the Home Office in 2012 with the sole aim of making it as difficult as possible to maintain asylum status in the UK by creating an unwelcoming environment for migrants. Despite Home Secretary Sajid Javid distancing himself from this policy in 2018, the brutal treatment and experiences of LGBTQI+ asylum seekers suggests the aftermath is still felt by the most marginalised members of society today and may thrive once again after Brexit.

Throughout the ongoing Brexit negotiations, it remains a pressing responsibility of the government to produce reformed human rights legislation which ensures both the protection and progression of trans rights and those seeking asylum.


This article has been written by Holly Barrow who is a political correspondent and content writer for the Immigration Advice Service – an organisation of immigration lawyers that offers free advice and support for asylum-seekers and victims of abuse.

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What is a refugee? The definition of ‘refugee’ explained

What is the definition of a “refugee”?

A refugee is someone who, due to a well-founded fear of persecution, war or violence, has been forced to flee their home country.

The legal definition of the term refugee was set out in the 1951 UN Convention on the Status of Refugees.

It was a few years after the Second World War. Nazi Germany had killed nine million people in the Holocaust, including six million Jews, and displaced millions more.

The world’s leaders wanted to ensure that protection for those displaced by war and persecution in internation law.

The convention set out the definition of the term ‘refugee’ as follows:

Owing to well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion is outside the country of his nationality and is unable or owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country; or who, not having a nationality and being outside the country of his former habitual residence is unable or, owing to such fear, unwilling to return to it.
– The 1951 UN Convention on the Status of Refugees

There are a few ideas going on here, so let’s break it down, bit by bit.

  1. “…well-founded fear”:
    This means that a refugee has solid grounds to their fear. They are facing real danger.
  2. “…of being persecuted…”:
    A refugee fears being oppression, hostility and violence so bad that it forces them to leave their country.
  3. “…reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion…”
    These are known as the ‘Convention reasons’. They break down the reasons why – under the Refugee Convention – a refugee is forced to flee.They were, of course, written in 1951, and today these reasons may seem too stringent. There is no mention of people who are forced to flee a country based on their sexuality. But times are changing – albeit slowly. The UK, for example, finally accepted that sexuality may be a reason to grant asylum in 2010.
  4. “…is outside the country of his nationality…”:
    Technically, someone who fits every stipulation but is still in their home country is called an ‘internally displaced person’, rather than a refugee.
  5. “…is unable or, owing to such fear, unwilling to return to [their country].”
    As a result of all of the above, this person is unable or unwilling to return home.

To be recognised as a refugee under the Refugee Convention, an asylum seeker would have to show that the above conditions apply to them.

1951 UN Refugee Convention signing

World leaders sign the 1951 UN Refugee Convention. Picture: UNHCR

Today, we often see people ask why refugees don’t settle in the first safe country they reach (N.B. most of them do). However, the Refugee Convention does not stipulate that refugees have to do this. Refugees are well within their rights to pass through safe countries before applying for asylum.

You can read about the history of the Refugee Convention and its full text on the UNHCR website.

What about ‘refugee status’?

Refugee status is a form of protection granted to those who successfully pass through Refugee Status Determination (RSD). RSD is the legal process by which governments ascertain whether an asylum seeker can be considered a refugee.

Refugee Status Determination, or RSD, is the legal or administrative process by which governments or UNHCR determine whether a person seeking international protection is considered a refugee under international, regional or national law. RSD is often a vital process in helping refugees realize their rights under international law.

It’s worth considering the difference between someone who is a de facto refugee, in that they’ve been forced to flee their home country for fear of persecution or violence, and someone who has refugee status, which is a legal status endowed upon them by a government.


Help Refugees supports refugees, asylum seekers and migrants across their whole journey. We’ve supported almost 1 million people in four years, thanks to the incredible hard work of 30,000 volunteers and wonderfully generous donors. Please consider setting up a small monthly donation of £3 to help us continue supporting displaced people across the globe.

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European Refugee Crisis: The truth

We often see figures on the far right referring to the “European refugee crisis”, or the “European migrant crisis”, in an attempt to stoke the fires of intolerance for political gain. 

They point to the influx of over a million refugees and migrants across Europe in 2015, suggesting that the West is facing an “invasion” or a “swarm”, and using that to justify sweeping immigration bans and hostile environments.

But the reality is very different. In 2019, only 9.6% of the world’s refugees live in Europe – and almost half of those live in Germany. That doesn’t sound like a “European refugee crisis” – it sounds like something that the wealthiest nations in the world can manage.

But for all the hysterical media coverage and fear-mongering slogans, the West is still a long way from supporting its fair share of refugees and displaced people.

Refugee statistics by Amnesty

Graphic courtesy of Amnesty International; figures sourced from the UNHCR.

When we started Help Refugees, we were often asked why so many refugees come to Europe – but the reality is that the overwhelming majority of refugees live in the nations neighbouring their home country.

Turkey, for example – which shares a border with Syria – is home to over 3.4 million refugees. Likewise, Jordan hosts 2.9 million – in a country of only 9 million people. That’s almost a third of the population.

The UK, on the other hand, is currently home to just 126,720 refugees. That’s only 0.48% of the world’s total – and only 0.18% of the UK’s population. Compare that to Jordan’s 32%, and suddenly the phrase “European refugee crisis” seems a bit silly.

Meanwhile, the European Union pays off Turkey and Libya to get them to stop the flow of refugees – leaving millions of people in extremely insecure environments, even putting people at risk of detention and human trafficking.

The EU-Turkey Deal has left millions of Syrians in limbo in Turkey, where it’s nearly impossible to find work as a refugee – but where they conveniently cause no headaches for Europe’s leaders. Likewise, in funding the coastguard and preventing people from leaving Libya, the EU is indirectly putting people at risk of modern slavery and trafficking.

Eviction in Dunkirk Grand Synthe

Refugees in Calais and Dunkirk live in dire conditions. With neither the UK nor the French government wanting to take responsibility, civil society organisations step in to fill the gap. Photo: HRO

That’s not to say that there’s not serious issues facing displaced people once they arrive in Europe, too. The best estimates suggest that around 10,000 unaccompanied minors have gone missing on the continent.

In Greece, there are almost 80,000 refugees and asylum seekers, many of whom live in the worst camps on the continent. The asylum system is overloaded and hundreds of unaccompanied minors have to sleep on the streets.

In Northern France, hundreds of people are forced to live on the streets and in the forests, blocked by hostile bureaucracies and anti-immigrant sentiment across the country, desperately trying to find safety in the UK.

We can do better than this – we have to.


If you want to help, you can set up a monthly donation to Help Refugees. Even just a few quid a month can make a difference. We’re still mostly funded by individuals like you, so your generosity would be hugely appreciated.

If you can’t afford to donate, fear not – there are still lots of ways you can get involved. Check out this article on 9 ways you can help refugees without spending any money.

Finally, you can sign up to our newsletter below to receive the latest refugee news and learn about how you can help.

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9 ways to help refugees without donating money

‘What can I do to help refugees?’ It’s a question we’re often asked. Because helping isn’t just about donating money. There are a huge number of ways you can help refugees – all without putting your hand in your pocket. Here are just a few. And if you’ve got a great suggestion to add to this list, please do get in touch.

 

If you’ve got five minutes or less…

 

  • Take action to help refugees from your laptop

Sometimes busy schedules or a lack of free time mean we need quick and easy ways to help. Luckily, there are a wide range of quick online actions you can take to support refugees.

 

If you’ve got a few hours to spare…

 

  • Volunteer in the UK to help refugees

There are many ways to help locally. You could volunteer with Help Refugees doing festival salvage – ensuring useful items left behind at UK festivals go to people who really need them. You could get in touch if you have specific skills (like filmmaking, animation, web design – to name a few) to see if we could put them to use. You could sign up to our mailing list – you’ll get regular updates about ways to get involved. Find out more about how to get involved in volunteering in the UK.

  • Find out how to welcome refugees to your community

Community Sponsorship enables local volunteer groups to resettle a refugee family in their neighbourhood. It’s a big commitment, but an incredible way to welcome refugees into your community. Whether it’s made up of your neighbours, friends or colleagues, if your group has got the time, commitment and can raise the necessary funds – you could transform the lives of a refugee family.  Find out more about community sponsorship.

If you’ve got a day…

 

  • Donate items to help refugees

Have you got some warm clothes or tinned food to donate? Maybe you have a whole van full? We need your help! Across the UK are donation drop-off points for these kinds of items. Check our website to see what’s currently needed, then get collecting!

  • Join campaigns and advocate for refugees

Once refugees get to the UK, often their journey is only just beginning. People face huge challenges in rebuilding their lives – and there are a wide range of campaigns trying to change policy and improve this.

You could join the campaign to lift the ban on working for people seeking refugee status – a policy that’s currently causing suffering and destitution.

You could campaign to end indefinite detention in the UK – an brutal system that means asylum seekers and the surivors of torture and trafficking can be held in detention without a time limit in the UK.

Help Refugees volunteers salvaging at Glastonbury

Help Refugees volunteers salvaging at Glastonbury

If you’ve got a week or more…

 

  • Volunteer internationally to help refugees

Help Refugees works in collaboration with indiGO Volunteers to connect you with more than 50 grassroots projects responding to the refugee crisis in Greece, Bosnia and Serbia. If you’re interested in volunteering, indiGO will match up your skills and availability with projects in need of help. Volunteers at these incredible groups are running community centres, providing medical care, delivering education projects, providing legal advice and so much more. Find out how to get involved in international volunteering.

  • Welcome refugees to your community

Community Sponsorship enables local volunteer groups to resettle a refugee family in their neighbourhood. It’s a big commitment, but an incredible way to welcome refugees into your community. Whether it’s made up of your neighbours, friends or colleagues, if your group has got the time, commitment and can raise the necessary funds – you could transform the lives of a refugee family.  Find out more about community sponsorship

  • Get your university to offer scholarships or bursaries to refugees

Education is a key element of fostering inclusion, boosting employment and enabling people to rebuild their lives. But entering or continuing higher education is a huge challenge for refugees. Worldwide, just 1% of refugee youth make it to university.

In the UK, you can join the campaign for equal access to higher education for refugees and asylum seekers. Many universities already offer home fees, tuition fee waivers, bursaries and scholarships. Make sure you uni does too. There’s a toolkit to get started from Student Action for Refugees.

  • Share your home with a refugee

Many single refugees who are not viewed as priorities for housing by local authorities – but finding the money for rent and a deposit is out of reach for many people. Because of this, refugees may homelessness and destitution. We can help prevent this. Schemes like Refugees at Home and Room for Refugees connect people with spare rooms in the UK, with refugees and asylum seekers in need of accommodation.

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803 evictions of refugees in Northern France since August: a new report

A new report by Help Refugees, L’Auberge des Migrants, Human Rights Observers and Refugee Info Bus reveals that there were at least 803 forced evictions of displaced people in Calais and Grande-Synthe, near Dunkirk, between 1 August 2018 and 1 June 2019, creating abject living conditions and forcing people to seek even more dangerous routes to reach the UK.

These evictions take place on a daily basis in Calais, in which displaced people are forced out of their living sites, subjected to police violence and, if they’re not present, the destruction of their belongings. They affect all displaced people in Calais, including unaccompanied children as young as 10 years old. The relentless and repetitive nature of the evictions appear to deliberately exhaust the communities.

Forced Evictions in Calais & Grand-Synthe report

Download the report

Forced evictions only serve to add to the accumulated trauma of refugees and migrants, creating further hostility rather than offer a dignified solution. This has led to a deterioration of both the physical and mental health of those affected.

This report proves the current policy focused on preventing any ‘fixation points’ of migrant communities to be a failure. Indeed, despite 803 evictions between August 2018 and June 2019, there are still over 1,000 displaced people present in the area, of which 255 are unaccompanied minors and 277 are people in family units.

You can read the full report here.

Our collective of associations coming together to witness, analyse, document, report and denounce such human rights breaches shows that the abuses of our governments is not in the name of their citizens.

Hundreds of police officers conducting degrading, inhumane, expensive and wholly ineffective actions is not a solution to the migrant crisis at our border. The vast sums of British citizen’s money assured by the UK government for ‘securitisation’ of the border could be more effectively used to provide dignified accommodation, access to legal asylum channels, uniting children with their families and providing safe travel and homes for lost, missing and unaccompanied children currently forced to sleep out on the streets by a potent mix of our government’s choice of inaction and intentional hostility to refugees – people in need of our help.

Download and read the full report:

Along with our partners, Help Refugees runs the largest aid operation in Northern France. If you would like to support our work, please consider donating today.

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Jo Cox’s sister writes open letter to British MPs: #SaveIdlib #onemillionkids

On the third anniversary of Jo Cox’s death, her sister Kim Leadbeater is asking senior political figures across the UK to take a break from Brexit to focus on one of the issues that mattered most to her: the humanitarian emergency in Syria.

One million children are currently trapped in Idlib province, facing Russian and regime airstrikes and horrific barrel bombs. Over 350 civilians have been killed in the last six weeks alone. The silence from British politicians is deafening.

The letter is co-signed by Alison McGovern MP and Tom Tugendhat MP. Jo Cox campaigned passionately for the protection of civilians caught in the conflict, and we want to honour her by putting aside our differences over Brexit for one day to focus on our shared humanity. You can read the full letter at the bottom of this page.

Write to your MP with our simple template – it takes 30 seconds. #onemillionkids #SaveIdlib

What you can do:

Write to your MP and demand that they do everything they can to protect those trapped in Idlib. You can use our template – it only takes 30 seconds.

On Sunday 16th June 2019, we’re asking leaders and leadership candidates to take a break from Brexit and tell us what they plan to do to protect the estimated one million children trapped in Idlib.

The UK is an incredibly powerful country with a seat at the UN Security Council. But the inaction on Syria is costing the lives of the most vulnerable. That’s why we want the head of every political party, or aspiring leader, to answer one straightforward question: if you are Prime Minister what will you do to save the million children trapped under bombs in Idlib?

If you’re on Twitter, use the hashtag #onemillionkids and ask party leaders and candidates what their plan is to resolve the crisis and protect these children.

We’re also asking Sunday newspapers to find prominent space for more coverage of the conflict on this day, and broadcasters to feature the story on the morning news shows.

Despite our preoccupation with Brexit, the UK remains a compassionate country which understands that the indiscriminate targeting of children is wrong.

This day is an opportunity for politicians on all sides to demonstrate their commitment to our shared humanity and the principles that Jo Cox lived for.


If you can spare 30 seconds, please consider using our template to write to your MP and ask them to #SaveIdlib. All you have to do is put your address & details in. Kim Leadbeater #SaveIdlib LetterKim Leadbeater #SaveIdlib Letter

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Join our call to protect one million children in Idlib #SaveIdlib

On the third anniversary of Jo Cox’s death, we’re asking senior political figures across the UK to take a break from Brexit to focus on one of the issues that mattered most to her: the humanitarian emergency in Syria.

One million children are currently trapped in Idlib province, facing Russian and regime airstrikes and horrific barrel bombs. Over 350 civilians have been killed in the last six weeks alone. The silence from British politicians is deafening.

Jo Cox campaigned passionately for the protection of civilians caught in the conflict, and we want to honour her by putting aside our differences over Brexit for one day to focus on our shared humanity.

What you can do:

Write to your MP and demand that they do everything they can to protect those trapped in Idlib. You can use our template – it only takes 30 seconds.

On Sunday 16th June 2019, we’re asking leaders and leadership candidates to take a break from Brexit and tell us what they plan to do to protect the estimated one million children trapped in Idlib.

The UK is an incredibly powerful country with a seat at the UN Security Council. But the inaction on Syria is costing the lives of the most vulnerable. That’s why we want the head of every political party, or aspiring leader, to answer one straightforward question: if you are Prime Minister what will you do to save the million children trapped under bombs in Idlib?

If you’re on Twitter, use the hashtag #onemillionkids and ask party leaders and candidates what their plan is to resolve the crisis and protect these children.

We’re also asking Sunday newspapers to find prominent space for more coverage of the conflict on this day, and broadcasters to feature the story on the morning news shows.

Despite our preoccupation with Brexit, the UK remains a compassionate country which understands that the indiscriminate targeting of children is wrong.

This day is an opportunity for politicians on all sides to demonstrate their commitment to our shared humanity and the principles that Jo Cox lived for.


If you can spare 30 seconds, please consider using our template to write to your MP and ask them to #SaveIdlib. All you have to do is put your address & details in. 

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Join the demo and demand a legal route to safety for child refugees

Join us on the 18th June near Parliament to call on our Government to resettle at least 10,000 child refugees from Europe and conflict regions over the next 10 years.

Councils across the country have already pledged places for 1,170 child refugees if the government commits to resettle 10,000 children. As part of Refugee Week, this demo will celebrate the 1,170 places pledged and call on the Government to begin filling these places by opening a new legal resettlement route.

 

Safe Passage and Help Refugees child refugees demo

We’ll be joined by Lord Alf Dubs and Safe Passage

Current routes to safety in the UK for children are due to close in 2020. But today, there are more child refugees in Europe than at any point since World War Two. Many are sleeping rough on the streets, whilst others have their lives on hold waiting in refugee camps. They’re vulnerable to trafficking, abuse and risking their lives in order to reach safety.

Without a new resettlement commitment there will be no legal route to Britain for those seeking sanctuary and no hope for these children.

80 years after the Kindertransport saved 10,000 child refugees from Nazi Europe in a matter of months, together we can show that the UK still has the capacity to welcome refugee children.

Join Lord Dubs, recently arrived refugees and Council leaders to demand that our Government lives up to the legacy of the Kindertransport.

If Britain could help 10,000 child refugees 80 years ago, we can do the same today. It’s #OurTurn


Timings

1.15: Arrive near Parliament (see below)

1.45: Speeches from Lord Alf Dubs, Council Leaders and recently arrived refugees

2.45: Event closes

Location

Exact location TBC – sign up to receive updates in advance of the demo

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Help Refugees: open call for Northern France funding applications

Help Refugees is announcing the Northern France Fund: an open call for grant applications for aid organisations working in Calais and Dunkirk.

Since our work began in Calais in 2015 we’ve seen the situation in France change drastically.

Given the changing needs of the communities we support and organisational changes to our partners in Calais, we are adapting the way we work in Northern France. More information about those changes can be found here.

As a result, we are opening a call for project proposals from organisations supporting refugees and displaced people in Northern France.

Our priorities for funding in Northern France are:

  • The provision of material aid (essential and dignity centric clothing distribution, tents, sleeping bags, shoes etc)
  • Firewood distribution
  • Psychosocial support, legal advocacy, child protection and safeguarding support to unaccompanied minors
  • Psychosocial support and material aid for women and families
  • Monitoring, data collection and analysis of human rights violations

We are accepting calls from:

  • Existing organisations that are operating from the Calais warehouse
  • All other organisations delivering work in this sector, specifically to meet the needs of displaced communities in Northern France
  • Groups of individuals wishing to form associations or groups to meet these needs. This is a change to put forward plans and activities for growth
  • Existing partner organisations of Help Refugees who are currently not working in Northern France who wish to set up operations to meet need in Calais or Grande-Synthe

The focus of our funding for projects in Northern France will be to support homeless displaced people and applications supporting this vulnerable group will be our priority. Applications that are supporting people in full time accommodation may not be considered for this grant on that basis.

Full details:
Northern France Fund Information Pack (PDF, 87kb)

How to apply:

Northern France Fund Proposal Form (PDF, 72kb)

Please download and fill out the above form, then send it to us via email at projects@helprefugees.org with the title ‘Northern France Fund Application’.

The deadline is Friday 7​th ​ June (Midnight BST).

Help Refugees annonce le Northern France Fund : un appel à candidatures ouvert pour demandes de subventions pour les organisations humanitaires qui opèrent à Calais et Dunkerque.

Notre travail a commencé ici, à Calais, en 2015, et a évolué au cours des quatre dernières années afin d’être adaptatif à un environnement en changement constant, en offrant des services humanitaires essentiels à des milliers de personnes déplacées. Prenant en considération les besoins changeants des communautés que l’on supporte, et des changements organisationnels au sein de nos partenaires opérationnel, nous changeons notre modèle de travail afin qu’il s’adapte au contexte actuel. Plus d’information sur ces changements peut être trouvé ici.

Par conséquent, nous offrons un appel ouvert aux organisations qui soutiennent les réfugiés et les personnes déplacées dans le Nord de la France.

Nos priorités globales en matière de subvention dans le Nord de la France sont:

  • La provision d’aide matérielle (distribution de vêtements essentiels qui offrent la dignité, de tentes, de sacs de couchage, de souliers, etc.)
  • Distribution de bois de chauffage
  • Soutien psychosocial, aide légale, protection des enfants et des mineurs non-accompagnés
  • Soutien psychosocial et aide matérielle pour les femmes et les familles
  • Surveillance, collection de données et analyse des violations des droits de l’homme

Nous acceptons les applications:

  • D’organisations existantes qui opèrent à partir de l’entrepôt de Calais
  • De toute autres organisations qui travaillent dans le secteur, particulièrement dans le but de rencontrer les besoins des communautés déplacées dans le Nord de la France
  • De groupes d’individus désirant à former une association ou un groupe pour répondre à ces besoins
  • Des partenaires existants de Help Refugees qui n’opèrent pas présentement dans le Nord de la France qui souhaitent mettre en place des opérations pour rencontrer les besoins à Calais ou Grande-Synthe

Le focus de notre subvention pour les projets dans le Nord de la France sera de soutenir les personnes déplacées sans-abris, et les applications visant à soutenir ce groupe vulnérable auront priorité. Par ce fait, des applications qui visent à soutenir des gens ayant accès à un logement à temps plein pourraient ne pas être considérées pour cette subvention.

Plus de détails sur le Northern France Fund:

FR Northern France Fund Information Pack

FR Northern France Fund Application Form

Comment postuler:

Veuillez télécharger et remplir ce formulaire, puis envoyer un e-mail à projects@helprefugees.org avec l’objet “Application pour le Northern France Fund”.

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