Blog

Salam LADC – supporting refugees in the Bekaa Valley, Lebanon

We are delighted to announce that we are now supporting Salam Lebanese Association for Development and Communication (Salam LADC سلام). Salam is a volunteer-based NGO hosting international volunteers, operating in the Bekaa Valley, in Lebanon. There are an estimated 500,000 refugees living in Bekaa, over 50% of whom are women and children. Salam are incredibly reactive in their distribution, liaising with other NGOs and local authorities to ensure they deliver exactly what is needed, where it is needed most.

They coordinate medical care for vulnerable individuals, supporting them in getting their cases processed, transporting them to medical facilities and fundraising to cover the costs, where necessary.

They also provide educational activities for children living in the camps with less access to education, they have a ‘play with purpose’ programme and a camp cleaning exercise ‘clean to green’ which gets kids running around and makes clearing up rubbish into a game with prizes for everyone!

Salam also work with local Lebanese communities, organising regular football games with Lebanese and Syrian children playing together, alongside UNDP. They carrying out regular livestock distributions to offer build capacity in Lebanese and Syrian communities.

Salam Lebanese Association for Development and Communication (1)

Salam Lebanese Association for Development and Communication (2)

Salam Lebanese Association for Development and Communication (3)


We would not be able to do our work without your support and kindness. Many of the refugees we help are fleeing the conflict zones of Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan. Others are trying to escape political oppression in countries like Eritrea. All are human beings like us. As well as providing immediate physical assistance, we want to help refugees maintain their dignity.

Please click through if you would like to find out more about our work in Calais, Dunkirk, Lesvos, Samos, Idomeni and other locations. If you would like to know how you can help refugees, please check out our Get Involved section where you can find out how to fundraise for us and how to make a donation. Thank you!

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Calais Needs: Items needed as of Monday 27th June

This week’s list of items needed in Calais by our amazing volunteers, updated Monday 27th June 2016.

If you wish to donate goods, please email Isabel on calaisdonations@gmail.com at least one week before you plan to set off. This will help Isabel and our other warehouse volunteers to organise the warehouse and plan for the distribution of goods.

Email Isabel to find out more about donation dates. Thank you for your time and support.


We urgently need roll mats/camping mats and big, thick blankets – our warehouse is out of the mats and we need more to distribute as soon as possible. Thank you!

 

Clothing:

We are currently oversupplied with children’s clothes and toys, however are experiencing a shortfall of teenage boys (13-17 years old – see below). If you are able to donate those, that would be wonderful!

 

Men:

  • Trainers especially sizes 41 to 43, and ideally black
  • S, M long-sleeved tops, jumpers and hoodies
  • S, M short-sleeved t-shirts
  • S, M  tracksuit bottoms
  • Waterproof trousers
  • S, M new underwear (not Y-fronts)
  • Gloves

 

Women:

  • XS, S, M leggings
  • XS, S, M tracksuit bottoms
  • S, M, L tunic tops with long sleeves
  • S, M Knickers
  • Boots/shoes up to size 39.  No heels!
  • Smaller cup size bras (up to 36C)

 

Youth (boys):

  • Tracksuit bottoms – for ages 12-17
  • Jeans – for ages 12-17
  • Underwear – for ages 12-17 or men’s size small
  • Hoodies – sizes small and medium
  • Trainers (ideally black) – 40, 41, 42, 43

 

Mobile Distribution (list of categories – click here for exhaustive list):

  • Bedding
  • Kitchen items
  • Mobile phones
  • Cleaning/clothes washing items
  • Lights
  • Padlocks (with both keys and combinations)
  • Most requested items:
  • Metal kettles
  • Plastic/metal cups and mugs
  • Lights and lanterns – click here to view on Leisure Fayre site
  • Unlocked smart phones/power banks
  • Camp beds/single mattresses

 

Hygiene:

  • Toilet paper
  • Men’s razors
  • Deodorant (men’s)
  • Shower gel and shampoo
  • Conditioner
  • Baby wipes
  • Nappies (only numbers 4, 5 and 6)
  • Wash bags

 

Food: we are running very low on food supplies. Material food donations are much more sustainable and logistically easier to arrange, so if you have funds available and are planning a delivery to the Auberge/ Help Refugees warehouse, the most needed items (most urgent at top)

  • Fresh fruit and veg (including salad and fresh herbs)
  • 1l UHT milk
  • 1kg sugar
  • Onions and garlic
  • Red lentils
  • Potatoes
  • Carrots
  • 1l oil
  • 1l olive oil
  • 1kg rice
  • Tinned fish (tuna, sardines, mackerel)
  • Biscuit packets
  • Tinned goods (tomatoes, chickpeas, kidney beans)
  • Tea and coffee
  • 750g salt
  • Dried fruit and nuts
  • Tinned fruit and veg
  • Vegetable stock cubes

Please bring ring pull tops and make sure everything is in date!

 

Warehouse and Office Needs:

  • Large rubble sacks and 80L
  • 130L, 110L, 80L strong bags
  • Orange tape
  • Brown parcel tape
  • Industrial saran wrap/cling film – for wrapping boxes
  • Permanent markers
  • Thick rubber bands
  • A4 lever arch folders
  • Polythene pockets (for lever arch files)
  • A4 printer paper

Miscellaneous:

  • Thick blankets
  • Rolling suitcases
  • Fire extinguishers
  • Bike locks and repair kits
  • Fire wood
  • 3 sims for phones (£1 each, have to be purchased in the UK)
  • Lycra sims

Please only bring items from this list. We cannot currently accept any other items.

Our Calais warehouse is now supporting both the Calais and Dunkerque camps; receiving, sorting and delivering all aid required in the two camps every day. More than ever we need large volumes of very specific items. Help us to service the needs of the people in the camps to the best of our ability by studying the information on this page carefully before you plan your trip. We rely on a large volunteer workforce to supply the camps with the items they desperately need and we are currently very low on volunteers. We simply do not have the people power to sort through the items we don’t require, which are taking up an inordinate amount of space in our busy warehouse. 

HOW TO ORGANISE GOODS

Try to concentrate on one or two items as a large amount of one item is much quicker and easier to distribute than a mixed load of many items.

It is very important that goods are clean, pre-sorted and clearly labelled e.g. a box of walking boots size 44, a bag of men’s jeans size 32, or pre-packaged food parcels.

If you want to be a real star then the best box sizes are 60 x 40 x 32.5 or 90 x 60 x 48

HOW TO DONATE

To deliver aid to the warehouse and/or to arrange distribution in the camp with the support of experienced volunteers, please complete this form

If you have any questions, please email calaisdonations@gmail.com


CLICK AND DONATE FOR DELIVERY STRAIGHT TO CALAIS

The wonderful people at Leisure Fayre have made it super easy to get these urgently needed items directly to Calais. Calais urgently needs sleeping bags and blankets.

Go to LesiureFayre, click on the Help Refugees logo to get to our specially selected list of most needed items and make your selection. To get 20% discount and free delivery to Calais, use the login and password provided on the checkout page.

Many thanks to Leisure Fayre for being so kind!

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National Refugee Week: The Story of Yamamah Matlak

It’s National Refugee Week and there are over 60 million people around the world who are still displaced from their homes due to war, persecution, poverty and terror. Help Refugees want to take this time to remember that each of those 60 million is an individual and unique human being equally deserving of our compassion and support, and who should never be considered or dismissed as just another number.

Each day this week we will be sharing a personal story from just one of the millions of refugees in the world. Please do take the time to read and share their and think about how you can join us to help alleviate their suffering.

Today we tell the story of Yamamah Matlak.

National Refugee Week The Story of Yamamah Matlak (1)

 

Yamamah comes from from Deir ez-Zor, Syria. In Arabic, the meaning of her name is ‘Dove’. She is a hilarious, cheeky and happy 10 year old.

Yamamah now resides in a tent at Oreokastro, a military refugee camp outside Thessaloniki, with her parents, grandfather, and four younger siblings.

Whenever she is photographed, she always looks at the lens with a great intensity as if she knows she could speak a thousand words about her situation as a refugee in Greece with the sadness of her stare.

Yamamah and her family complain about the heat.

She never goes anywhere without carrying her two younger sisters, Rimas and Batul, along with her.  Her family hope to be granted asylum in Germany.

National Refugee Week The Story of Yamamah Matlak (3)

Yamamah is just one of the millions of refugee children in the world. Each one of these children has the potential to become whatever they dream of being, if we only give them the chance. Please visit https://mydonate.bt.com/charities/helprefugees to donate to help children just like them.


We would not be able to do our work without your support and kindness. Many of the refugees we help are fleeing the conflict zones of Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan. Others are trying to escape political oppression in countries like Eritrea. All are human beings like us. As well as providing immediate physical assistance, we want to help refugees maintain their dignity.

Please click through if you would like to find out more about our work in Calais, Dunkirk, Lesvos, Samos, Idomeni and other locations. If you would like to know how you can help refugees, please check out our Get Involved section where you can find out how to fundraise for us and how to make a donation. Thank you!

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A statistical insight – the boys helped by Refugee Youth Service in Calais

One of the organisations we support in the Calais refugee camp is the Refugee Youth Service (formerly Baloo’s Youth Centre). This organisation provides a safe place for boys aged 12 – 18 to relax and learn while they live in the camp. The team has been working to keep track of the boys that they help and sent us this update for sharing. 

Understanding the tracking and monitoring system

The tracking and monitoring system used by RYS was created in December 2015. This system was implemented by the Service as a means to keep clear records of young people in the camp and to offer support and safety measures when necessary. RYS is currently the only service on camp that tracks and monitors the young people.

As the Service has developed to meet the growing needs of the youth so too has the tracking and monitoring system. This is evident in the increasing number of children being added to the database each week reflecting the transient nature of the camp.

Since the Southern evictions in March 2016, RYS has tracked and monitored over 200 young people in the Calais camp. The role of RYS has expanded into child protection and safeguarding as part of its daily service delivery. The tracking and monitoring system notifies the Service when one individual needs additional support. Acting as a referral network, RYS then refers to and follows up with the specialists in that field to ensure that the child is given the best support available.

Furthermore, the tracking and monitoring also alerts the Service when the RYS staff within the camp have not engaged with one child over a particular period of time. The team then attempts to contact the missing individual to ensure that they are safe. If no contact can be made, the service reports the young person missing to the relevant French authorities. This procedure has been very challenging on more than one occasion. However this is the role of RYS as the children in the camp have gone ‘under the radar’ and the French state is often unaware of their presence, thus neglecting their protection. By continuing to track the young people after they have left the Calais camp, RYS are able to give a snapshot at the demographics of one of Europe’s most marginalised and vulnerable groups.

Tracking and Monitoring Results

General Statistics

Number of young people tracked and monitored since March 2016: 208*

* It is important to mention that this number does not reflect the amount of youth who attend our service, which is far greater. Given the transient nature of the camp and the delicacy of obtaining personal information from the youth, it is only possible to track and monitor those who regularly attend our Service.

1

Currently in Calais Camp: Statistics Breakdown (of 141 Youth)

Nationality

2

Age

3

Unaccompanied status

4

Comments: To have a clear definition of an unaccompanied minor in the Calais camp is often extremely difficult. The difference in the cultural term of ‘uncle’ has meant that many children claim they are with a distant family relation but this may be a friend from the child’s hometown or village or someone they travelled with. Also given the transient nature of the camp, it has often meant that adults responsible for the child have made it to the UK separately. Therefore, RYS have determined that the definition of an accompanied child is one who is with their immediate family members (mother or father) but not a brother, as again we often have had cases of older brothers crossing without their siblings.

Accommodation status

5

Comments: It is important to mention that the number of youth living in tents is increasing dramatically. This is due to a high influx of people into the camp over the past couple of months combined with the construction and maintenance ban enforced by the CRS riot police. Also, the violence on the 26th May which burnt down much of the Eritrean and Ethiopian community has meant that these young people had their shelters destroyed and are now forced to live in tents. If the situation continues in this way, the camp will revert to what it looked like pre-October 2015.

Missing children

Since March 2016, RYS have filed 13 missing children reports. Of the 13 –

Current status

7

Located by

8

Moving Forward

RYS strives to improve its service and expand its reach to include all young people in the Calais camp. Therefore the tracking and monitoring system is continuously updated and amended to increase its efficiency. The latest improvements are implementing a referral system to other direct work services on camp who contact us if they meet an unaccompanied minor who does not engage with the service, as well as working in collaborating with the Help Refugees census team to locate the most marginalised and vulnerable children on camp.

 

Featured image: This was the backdrop for many of the boys in the camp in March of this year. Please click through here to read more.


We would not be able to do our work without your support and kindness. Many of the refugees we help are fleeing the conflict zones of Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan. Others are trying to escape political oppression in countries like Eritrea. All are human beings like us. As well as providing immediate physical assistance, we want to help refugees maintain their dignity.

Please click through if you would like to find out more about our work in Calais, Dunkirk, Lesvos, Samos, Idomeni and other locations. If you would like to know how you can help refugees, please check out our Get Involved section where you can find out how to fundraise for us and how to make a donation. Thank you!

Read more

National Refugee Week: The Story of Zemaya

It’s National Refugee Week and there are over 60 million people around the world who are still displaced from their homes due to war, persecution, poverty and terror. Help Refugees want to take this time to remember that each of those 60 million is an individual and unique human being equally deserving of our compassion and support, and who should never be considered or dismissed as just another number.

Each day this week we will be sharing a personal story from just one of the millions of refugees in the world. Please do take the time to read and share their and think about how you can join us to help alleviate their suffering.

Today we tell the story of Zemaya.

Zemaya-fbig

Zemaya is an 8 year old Syrian girl. When this photo was taken, she was living in the Idomeni refugee camp, Europe’s largest informal refugee camp since World War II.

When it rained, the area would quickly be flooded and the camp was often overwhelmed. Here Zemaya walked through puddles in the fields along the Greek/Macedonian

border. She is now living at Oreokastro military camp outside Thessaloniki in Northern Greece with her family, who dream claiming asylum in Germany where they hope to live in peace.

Zemaya just one of the millions of refugee children in the world today. Each one of these children has the potential to become whatever they dream of being, if we only give them the chance. Please visit https://mydonate.bt.com/charities/helprefugees to donate to help children just like them.


We would not be able to do our work without your support and kindness. Many of the refugees we help are fleeing the conflict zones of Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan. Others are trying to escape political oppression in countries like Eritrea. All are human beings like us. As well as providing immediate physical assistance, we want to help refugees maintain their dignity.

Please click through if you would like to find out more about our work in Calais, Dunkirk, Lesvos, Samos, Idomeni and other locations. If you would like to know how you can help refugees, please check out our Get Involved section where you can find out how to fundraise for us and how to make a donation. Thank you!

Read more

National Refugee Week: The Story of Saluhah

It’s National Refugee Week and there are over 60 million people around the world who are still displaced from their homes due to war, persecution, poverty and terror. Help Refugees want to take this time to remember that each of those 60 million is an individual and unique human being equally deserving of our compassion and support, and who should never be considered or dismissed as just another number.

Each day this week we will be sharing a personal story from just one of the millions of refugees in the world. Please do take the time to read and share their and think about how you can join us to help alleviate their suffering.

Today we tell the story of Saluhah.

National Refugee Week - The Story of Saluhah

Six year old Saluhah lived in Idomeni with his siblings and mother. When they could get flour and oil, Saluhah’s mother loved to make fresh bread. His father moved to Germany before the borders were closed. As a result, the family have been separated for months.

They are now in the military camp Oreokastro outside of Thessaloniki. They have no idea when they will be reunited.

Salulah is just one of the millions of refugee children in the world. Each one of these children has the potential to become whatever they dream of being, if we only give them the chance. Please visit https://mydonate.bt.com/charities/helprefugees to donate to help children just like them.


We would not be able to do our work without your support and kindness. Many of the refugees we help are fleeing the conflict zones of Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan. Others are trying to escape political oppression in countries like Eritrea. All are human beings like us. As well as providing immediate physical assistance, we want to help refugees maintain their dignity.

Please click through if you would like to find out more about our work in Calais, Dunkirk, Lesvos, Samos, Idomeni and other locations. If you would like to know how you can help refugees, please check out our Get Involved section where you can find out how to fundraise for us and how to make a donation. Thank you!

Read more

National Refugee Week: The Story of Ahmed

It’s National Refugee Week and there are over 60 million people around the world who are still displaced from their homes due to war, persecution, poverty and terror. Help Refugees want to take this time to remember that each of those 60 million is an individual and unique human being equally deserving of our compassion and support, and who should never be considered or dismissed as just another number.

Each day this week we will be sharing a personal story from just one of the millions of refugees in the world. Please do take the time to read and share their and think about how you can join us to help alleviate their suffering.

Today we tell the story of Ahmed.

National Refugee Week - Ahmed

 

Ahmed is 10 years old and an unaccompanied minor. He is from Afghanistan.

Ahmed says he travelled to France with people smugglers – he was with a large group. In Iran he was put in a boot with other people. He did not want to go in. He felt claustrophobic and was frightened. They hit him and made him get in.  In Iran, near the border with Turkey, they were attacked by robbers who took everything. Seven people were shot dead.  They were forced to walk huge distances for many, many hours. Ahmed says it took eight attempts to cross over into Bulgaria.  In Bulgaria the police were fighting them. Ahmed says he was scared about being beaten.  He says in Serbia they were inside a small van with 35 people and “it was very difficult”. Ahmed says he was shot at in Hungary by the police again.  He said it was very difficult to get food and water and he was often hungry. The smugglers left him in Italy, he made the rest of the journey with other people out of the group. It took about three months.

Ahmed left Afghanistan because it was unsafe. “I am scared of bombs so I run.”

Ahmed’s father was killed by bomb. His mother and uncle were worried about the increasing dangers. His mother sold some land to pay smugglers.

Ahmed talks about not being able to sleep. He attempts to get to the UK most nights. He talks about getting hurt when he is ‘andakh’ (the word used in the camp for trying to get to the UK), falling over in the dark, being chased by the police and by dogs. Being sprayed with CS gas and being pushed around by the police. He talks about always being dirty and often comes home wet and has nothing to change into. Ahmed told me he was scared at night time in the Jungle because he sees people drinking and acting “crazy”. He has witnessed many fights and people getting injured. After the last eviction we gave Ahmed a caravan. There have been a number of incidents where Ahmed has had his windows smashed and his belongings stolen.

Ahmed is one of the youngest unaccompanied children in Calais Jungle. He has been there for over six months. Ahmed has not engaged with many volunteers and spends his time within the Afghan community. He does not take part in activities in the camp. Ahmed says he will not claim asylum in France. He continues to attempt to get to the UK by going to the local ‘lorry parks’ and breaking in and hiding, he never knows if the lorry is definitely going to the UK and sometimes they wait many hours for the lorry to move and many children report ending up in Paris or other cities.

(There have been many reports of refugees hiding in refrigerated lorries and running out of oxygen.)

A number of children report ‘trying’ on the ‘autobaan’. Refugees slow the traffic down by standing in the road, which enables others to open the back and get in. There have been a number of serious injuries and deaths on the roads.

Ahmed is a very funny and intelligent boy. Over the months he has started to show signs of depression and exhaustion and has become quieter and more withdrawn even amongst his community. A number of Afghan men have reported that they are worried about him. I have stayed with Ahmed in his caravan when I have been concerned about him, and he has talked to me about his feelings. He is desperate to leave the Jungle, and wants to be in the UK – he talks about ‘no chance’. He does not know what to do and has cried about it. I am very concerned about his emotional wellbeing.

Ahmed does not mix well with his peers and is quite isolated.

Ahmed has obvious trouble talking about the situation at home, he becomes quite agitated and withdrawn.

Ahmed says he wants to go to the UK and he wants to be safe. He talks about having a ‘good home’ and being able to play cricket. Ahmed says he would like to go to school. He says he wants to live in Birmingham, as he has been told many Afghans go there.

Ahmed wants to have contact with his friend Jamil. He also mentions being near to his friends from the Jungle.

Ahmed has also said he wants to remain in contact with Liz.*

Ahmed is very vulnerable and there are hundreds of unaccompanied minors – each with their own tale of unimaginable hardship – in the Calais camp. Every one of these children has the potential to become whatever they dream of being, if we only give them the chance. Please visit https://mydonate.bt.com/charities/helprefugees to donate to help children just like them.

 

*Liz Clegg runs the Unofficial Women and Children’s Centre and has been a huge advocate and source of love and support for the unaccompanied minors in the camp. We are very proud to support her in her work.


We would not be able to do our work without your support and kindness. Many of the refugees we help are fleeing the conflict zones of Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan. Others are trying to escape political oppression in countries like Eritrea. All are human beings like us. As well as providing immediate physical assistance, we want to help refugees maintain their dignity.

Please click through if you would like to find out more about our work in Calais, Dunkirk, Lesvos, Samos, Idomeni and other locations. If you would like to know how you can help refugees, please check out our Get Involved section where you can find out how to fundraise for us and how to make a donation. Thank you!

Read more

World Refugee Day: The Story of Miša Omar

It’s World Refugee Day today and there are over 60 million people around the world who are still displaced from their homes due to war, persecution, poverty and terror. Help Refugees want to take today to remember that each of those 60 million is an individual and unique human being equally deserving of our compassion and support, and who should never be considered or dismissed as just another number.

Starting today, and for the rest of National Refugee Week, we will be sharing one personal story every day of just one of the millions of refugees in the world. Please do take the time to read and share their and think about how you can join us to help alleviate their suffering.

Today we tell the story of Miša Omar.

National Refugee Week - the story of Miša Omar (1)

Miša is a 3 year old Kurd from Al-­Qamishli, a Syrian town near the border with Turkey.

In Idomeni, she lived with her family of six, in a two man tent. When it rained, the blankets which she shared with her 9 month old brother Omar would be completely damp.

Despite Miša’s mother having a brother in Germany, they were told their chances of reunification were small.

After two months in Idomeni her parents were desperate to go home, despite the danger of going back to their war torn country, and the months it might take to get there on foot.

But without any money, they knew they were unable to pay the smugglers which they would require to cross the borders.

Finally, they decided to apply for asylum in Greece. They continue to wait in the military camp in which they live now, for the United Nations registration system which will allow them to start their application process.

Misa is just one of the millions of refugee children in the world. Each one of these children has the potential to become whatever they dream of being, if we only give them the chance. Please visit https://mydonate.bt.com/charities/helprefugees to donate to help children just like them.

National Refugee Week - the story of Miša Omar (2)


We would not be able to do our work without your support and kindness. Many of the refugees we help are fleeing the conflict zones of Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan. Others are trying to escape political oppression in countries like Eritrea. All are human beings like us. As well as providing immediate physical assistance, we want to help refugees maintain their dignity.

Please click through if you would like to find out more about our work in Calais, Dunkirk, Lesvos, Samos, Idomeni and other locations. If you would like to know how you can help refugees, please check out our Get Involved section where you can find out how to fundraise for us and how to make a donation. Thank you!

Read more

New Calais census released – 700 children in Calais, 78% on their own

Help Refugees and L’Auberge des Migrants conducted a recent census on the Calais “Jungle” and found that there are currently 6,123 people living in the refugee camp, with numbers constantly rising.

We found that 700 are children, 78% of whom are unaccompanied. The youngest child in the camp is just four months old and the youngest unaccompanied minor is ten years old. The 544 unaccompanied children in the camp are now eligible for resettlement in the UK under Dubs Amendment – please click here to find out how you can support efforts to bring them to safety.

Other notable findings:

  • There are over 20 different nationalities in the refugee community. The largest groups are from Afghanistan (36%) and  Sudan (32%), with 5% coming from Ethiopia and 3% from Syria.
  • There has been a 32% increase in unaccompanied minors in the last month. If this rate of increase continues, by the end of the summer there could be 1,000 unaccompanied minors living in the camp.
  • Many Ethiopians come from the Oromo area, which has witnessed a brutal crackdown by authorities since November of last year. This Human Rights Watch report details the deteriorating security situation that has prompted many to flee.

 

june-2016-census_block_1 june-2016-census_block_2 june-2016-census_block_3 june-2016-census_block_4

 


We would not be able to do our work without your support and kindness. Many of the refugees we help are fleeing the conflict zones of Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan. Others are trying to escape political oppression in countries like Eritrea. All are human beings like us. As well as providing immediate physical assistance, we want to help refugees maintain their dignity.

Please click through if you would like to find out more about our work in Calais, Dunkirk, Lesvos, Samos, Idomeni and other locations. If you would like to know how you can help refugees, please check out our Get Involved section where you can find out how to fundraise for us and how to make a donation. Thank you!

Read more

Calais Needs: Items needed as of Monday 20th June

This week’s list of items needed in Calais by our amazing volunteers, updated Monday 20th June 2016.

If you wish to donate goods, please email Isabel on calaisdonations@gmail.com at least one week before you plan to set off. This will help Isabel and our other warehouse volunteers to organise the warehouse and plan for the distribution of goods.

Email Isabel to find out more about donation dates. Thank you for your time and support.


We urgently need roll mats/camping mats and big, thick blankets – our warehouse is out of the mats and we need more to distribute as soon as possible. Thank you!

 

Clothing:

We are currently oversupplied with children’s clothes and toys, however are experiencing a shortfall of teenage boys (13-17 years old – see below). If you are able to donate those, that would be wonderful!

 

Men:

  • Trainers especially sizes 41 to 43, and ideally black
  • S, M long-sleeved tops, jumpers and hoodies
  • S, M short-sleeved t-shirts
  • S, M  tracksuit bottoms
  • Waterproof trousers
  • S, M new underwear (not Y-fronts)
  • Gloves

 

Women:

  • XS, S, M leggings
  • XS, S, M tracksuit bottoms
  • S, M, L tunic tops with long sleeves
  • S, M Knickers
  • Boots/shoes up to size 39.  No heels!
  • Smaller cup size bras (up to 36C)

 

Youth (boys):

  • Tracksuit bottoms – for ages 12-17
  • Jeans – for ages 12-17
  • Underwear – for ages 12-17 or men’s size small
  • Hoodies – sizes small and medium
  • Trainers (ideally black) – 40, 41, 42, 43

 

Mobile Distribution (list of categories – click here for exhaustive list):

  • Bedding
  • Kitchen items
  • Mobile phones
  • Cleaning/clothes washing items
  • Lights
  • Padlocks (with both keys and combinations)
  • Most requested items:
  • Metal kettles
  • Plastic/metal cups and mugs
  • Lights and lanterns – click here to view on Leisure Fayre site
  • Unlocked smart phones/power banks
  • Camp beds/single mattresses

 

Hygiene:

  • Toilet paper
  • Men’s razors
  • Deodorant (men’s)
  • Shower gel and shampoo
  • Conditioner
  • Baby wipes
  • Nappies (only numbers 4, 5 and 6)
  • Wash bags

 

Food: we are running very low on food supplies. Material food donations are much more sustainable and logistically easier to arrange, so if you have funds available and are planning a delivery to the Auberge/ Help Refugees warehouse, the most needed items (most urgent at top)

  • Fresh fruit and veg (including salad and fresh herbs)
  • 1l UHT milk
  • 1kg sugar
  • Onions and garlic
  • Red lentils
  • Potatoes
  • Carrots
  • 1l oil
  • 1l olive oil
  • 1kg rice
  • Tinned fish (tuna, sardines, mackerel)
  • Biscuit packets
  • Tinned goods (tomatoes, chickpeas, kidney beans)
  • Tea and coffee
  • 750g salt
  • Dried fruit and nuts
  • Tinned fruit and veg
  • Vegetable stock cubes

Please bring ring pull tops and make sure everything is in date!

 

Warehouse and Office Needs:

  • Large rubble sacks and 80L
  • 130L, 110L, 80L strong bags
  • Orange tape
  • Brown parcel tape
  • Industrial saran wrap/cling film – for wrapping boxes
  • Permanent markers
  • Thick rubber bands
  • A4 lever arch folders
  • Polythene pockets (for lever arch files)
  • A4 printer paper

Miscellaneous:

  • Thick blankets
  • Rolling suitcases
  • Fire extinguishers
  • Bike locks and repair kits
  • Fire wood
  • 3 sims for phones (£1 each, have to be purchased in the UK)
  • Lycra sims

Please only bring items from this list. We cannot currently accept any other items.

Our Calais warehouse is now supporting both the Calais and Dunkerque camps; receiving, sorting and delivering all aid required in the two camps every day. More than ever we need large volumes of very specific items. Help us to service the needs of the people in the camps to the best of our ability by studying the information on this page carefully before you plan your trip. We rely on a large volunteer workforce to supply the camps with the items they desperately need and we are currently very low on volunteers. We simply do not have the people power to sort through the items we don’t require, which are taking up an inordinate amount of space in our busy warehouse. 

HOW TO ORGANISE GOODS

Try to concentrate on one or two items as a large amount of one item is much quicker and easier to distribute than a mixed load of many items.

It is very important that goods are clean, pre-sorted and clearly labelled e.g. a box of walking boots size 44, a bag of men’s jeans size 32, or pre-packaged food parcels.

If you want to be a real star then the best box sizes are 60 x 40 x 32.5 or 90 x 60 x 48

HOW TO DONATE

To deliver aid to the warehouse and/or to arrange distribution in the camp with the support of experienced volunteers, please complete this form

If you have any questions, please email calaisdonations@gmail.com


CLICK AND DONATE FOR DELIVERY STRAIGHT TO CALAIS

The wonderful people at Leisure Fayre have made it super easy to get these urgently needed items directly to Calais. Calais urgently needs sleeping bags and blankets.

Go to LesiureFayre, click on the Help Refugees logo to get to our specially selected list of most needed items and make your selection. To get 20% discount and free delivery to Calais, use the login and password provided on the checkout page.

Many thanks to Leisure Fayre for being so kind!

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